System Reference Document

The DicePunk System

System Reference Document


WHAT THIS IS AND WHY IT IS RAD

The DicePunk System is a free roleplaying game system. I think you probably already know what an RPG is if you’re here, so I don’t want to spend too much time on telling you stuff you already know. In case you really don’t know, here’s a short and excessively quirky primer:

Did you ever play Cops and Robbers as a kid? Or Cowboys and Indians? Knights and Dragons? Well, roleplaying games provides you with rules to play any of the above or almost anything else you can think of. It’s Cops and Robbers, for grownups. All you need to play any RPG is the rules, some dice, some pencils and paper, some friends, and some beer. Actually, the beer is technically optional.

One of those friends will take on the role of the GM (game master), interpreting the rules and lovingly handcrafting the nightmare that the other players must endure.

While there’s dice, and sometimes even miniatures and a mat, roleplaying is all about storytelling – closer to an exercise in improvised acting than a traditional, monopoly-style board game. It’s about immersing yourself in your imagination and pretending that you’re someone else.

Some people use roleplaying in order to better understand other people, as well as themselves. Others use roleplaying in order to watch their nomadic murder-hobos blow things up and steal in a relatively consequence-free environment – a shared imaginary space. For most people, the fun of roleplaying falls somewhere right in between these two poles.

What kind of RPG is the DicePunk system? Great question! I love to describe it as “rules lite” compared to most traditional RPGs, but if you’re coming here from something like Fiasco or Dungeon World, well, it’s certainly a wee bit crunchier and heftier than those. So, I think I’m going to go with “rules medium”. It’s definitely not like Dungeons & Dragons or Shadowrun where you might spend precious hours just micro-managing your character’s starting gear selection. However, it’s also not a “story game” that feels more like telling a collaborative story than playing a game.

Your character will have stats, and those stats will totes matter.

The main strengths of the DicePunk System:

What types of stories does the DicePunk System excel at telling? Or, in other words, what exactly do we mean byCinematic Roleplaying In The Now?

Well, I’ll be honest off the bat. If your roleplaying jones is to delve into dungeons in search of a dragon to slay, or to crew a spaceship headed out into the stars, then you’ll want to look elsewhere.

However, the DicePunk System has you covered if any/all of the following apply: 

On its own, the DicePunk System gives you all the tools you need to run everything from 80’s action blockbusters toHard Boiled to Fargo to Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction. The two DicePunk System games already published expand on this.

Phantasm (2010) includes the DicePunk System and adds in everything you need to run games that feel like Evil Dead,From Dusk Till Dawn, or Versus.

Psionics: The Next Stage in Human Evolution is an RPG that bundles the heart of the DicePunk System with loads of extra material that will add FirestarterScanners, and Akira to your repertoire of roleplaying games.

The Dicepunk System is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial 4.0 International License.


PSIONIC PHANTASMS 

Basically, Phantasm(2010) and Psionics: The Next Stage In Human Evolution use the same core game rules as each other – the DicePunk System, as presented here – and are basically crossover-compatible. However, Psionics was written a few years after Phantasm(2010), when I was a few years older and a few years wiser, so some minor design improvements on the original DicePunk System as presented in Phantasm(2010) were snuck in to Psionics without much comment. Most of these changes are very minor, but if you have an eye for small details, then this section’s for you. 

In this section, I’m going to try and give commentary and guidance on anywhere that the Psionics and Phantasm(2010)rules disagree with each other. As a general guideline for anything I may have missed, use the following Golden Rule: the basic DicePunk rules as presented in Psionics supersede the basic DicePunk rules as presented in Phantasm(2010)wherever they disagree, and the basic DicePunk rules as presented here in the DicePunk SRD supersede both Psionicsand Phantasm(2010) should they contradict each other.

Please also note the Golden Exceptions, which are as follows: 

With all that said, here goes: 

Special Attributes: In Phantasm(2010), Special Attributes are calculated differently based on Badass Tier, whereas inPsionics and here, there is a set formula for each Special Attribute. This is as it should be. Use the formulae on p. 21 ofPhantasm(2010) when building Phantasm(2010) characters, and use the standard formulae when building characters for any other DicePunk game. 

Initiative: In Psionics, Initiative is correctly presented as (Speed × 2) + 2d6. This change was made to ensure that character Speed mattered more to Initiative order than random chance. To apply this to Phantasm(2010) PCs if desired, leave the variable (d6) portion of the Initiative as-is, but change Speed to (Speed × 2) for each Badass Tier. Monster Initiative for Phantasm(2010) does not need to change and should be left as-is. 

Skill Picks: In Psionics and here, starting Skill Picks are equal to double the starting character’s Wits. InPhantasm(2010), starting Skill Picks are still based on the character’s Wits, but the formula for calculating them depends on the character’s Badass Tier. This is as it should be. 

Untrained Penalty: In both Phantasm(2010) and Psionics, it erroneously states that Combat Skills that are Untrained suffer a -4 Penalty to the roll. This is incorrect. In every DicePunk game, the Penalty for using an Untrained Skill is only a -2 (a -2 DM for non-combat Skills or a -2 Attack Penalty for Combat Skills), even if the Skill is a Combat Skill. 

Technique Picks: If you compare p. 27 of Phantasm(2010) to the Campaign Power Level table, you’ll notice thatPhantasm(2010) PCs at all Badass Tiers get significantly more Techniques than vanilla DicePunk PCs and way more Techniques than Espers in Psionics. This is correct, and should not be changed. 

Techniques: There are many Techniques that are unique to Phantasm(2010), and do not appear in Psionics or in this SRD. This is intentional. 

Aiming: Aiming in combat improved from Phantasm(2010) to Psionics. The rule presented in Psionics, that each Action spent aiming at a target applies a Defense Modifier of -2, up to a maximum -DM of twice the aiming character’s weapon Skill Bonus, should be considered correct for all DicePunk games.

Grappling: The rules for Grappling presented here and in Psionics should be used, rather than the older and slightly less detailed Grappling rules that originally appeared in Phantasm(2010). This includes the new Defense Modifier for grappling/being grappled.

Burst Fire: Using the “Hose” option with Burst Fire should add +2d6 damage. Using the “Spray” option with Burst Fire should inflict a -3 DM.

Covering Fire: The Speed Check to avoid taking damage when moving through an area being “covered” (with bullets!) should be Hard.

Damage and Healing: Phantasm(2010) characters heal a variable amount of Health every eight hours of rest based on their Badass Tier, as indicated in Phantasm(2010) on p. 55. Other DicePunk characters heal a fixed amount of 2d6 + Strength Health for every eight hours of rest. This is as it should be.

Wound Shock: You can use the optional Wound Shock rules presented here and in Psionics for your Phantasm(2010)campaign, if you want to.

First Aid: Somewhat more detailed rules for using First Aid are presented here and in Psionics, compared to those inPhantasm(2010). The former should be considered to take precedence.


GAME CONCEPTS

This section tells you the very basics of how to play RPGs using the DicePunk System. To play this game, by the way, you're probably going to need at least three players (and probably no more than six or seven), some pencils, a character sheet, and a bunch of six sided dice. Each player's gonna want between six and twelve dice. The more copies of these rules you have around the table, the better.

DICE AND YOU

Like a lot of roleplaying games, in this one you're going to use dice. You don't need to roll dice unless you're doing something that's kind of tricky or would have negative consequences for failure. So, driving your car to work would never require a Drive Test, but trying to drive through a police barricade while escaping from your workplace totally would. 

We only use six sided dice, because they're the easiest to find. As shorthand, we use the standard code of (Integer) d(ice)(#ofsides). For instance, “roll 1d6” means “roll 1 six-sided die” and “roll 5d6” means “roll five six-sided dice”. 

Just about all of the time when you “roll the dice” in a DicePunk System game, you're rolling 2d6. The main exception is damage rolls, which call for a variable number of dice depending on the weapon/Attack. In either case, you're adding the results of the dice together to find the sum.

CHECKS, TESTS, AND ATTACKS

There are a few types of primary dice rolls which determine if a character succeeds or fails at something. You either succeed or fail, hit or miss. Degree doesn’t matter.


ATTRIBUTE CHECKS

All characters have Attributes – scores or statistics that measure how weak or powerful that character is in various areas. Attributes are generally rated from 1 (pathetic) to 10 (superhuman), with a 3 being average for a human and a 5 being very good. The four Attributes every human has are Strength, Speed, Wits, and Will.

A GM should call for an Attribute Check whenever a character’s raw strength or endurance, pure dexterity or foot speed, intellect, perception, courage, or willpower are being tested. To make an Attribute Check, roll 2d6. If the result is equal to or less than the Attribute being tested, the character has succeeded. Obviously, the higher an Attribute is, the easier it is to succeed a Check of that Attribute.

In general, whether or not a failed Attribute Check can be retried is up to the GM, and should be determined based on the situation. For example, if a character fails a Strength Check to break a padlock, the GM may choose not to allow the same character to try again, unless the lock becomes damaged, the player becomes stronger, or the player finds tools or a weapon that could conceivably make the task easier. Likewise, the time an Attribute Check takes is up to the GM. A successful Strength Check to open a stuck door may be resolved in a few in-game seconds or minutes, but a successful Strength Check to push a car to a destination could take several in-game hours.

A natural 2 (snake eyes) on an Attribute Check is always a success.

A natural 12 on an Attribute Check is always a failure.


SKILL TESTS 

Skill Tests are like Attribute Checks, with some important differences. When making a Skill Test, as with an Attribute Check, a lower roll is always better. A Skill Test is resolved as a modified Check of the Skill’s Linked Attribute, which is adjusted as indicated below. 

Similar to Attribute Checks, in general, whether or not a failed Skill Test can be retried is up to the GM and should be determined based on the situation. Likewise, the time a Skill Test takes is up to the GM. 

A natural 2 (snake eyes) on a Skill Test is always a success. 

A natural 12 on a Skill Test is always a failure.


DIFFICULTY MODIFIERS (DM) 

Not all tasks are created equal, and that is where Difficulty Modifiers come into play, when making Skill Tests andAttribute Checks. A Difficulty Modifier (DM) is a +/- adjustment applied to the Attribute being checked or the Linked Attribute of the Skill being tested. 

Difficulty

Difficulty Modifier

Very Easy

+4

Easy

+2

Hard

-2 (Min. 2)

Crushingly Hard

-4 (Min. 2)

 


ATTACKS 

A character Attacks when he attempts to use a Combat Skill to harm another character or a monster. Unlike Skill Tests and Attribute Checks, players making an Attack want to roll high. A higher Attack Roll is better than a low one. 

To make an Attack, roll 2d6 and add the Skill Bonus from the relevant Combat Skill to the result. Firing a handgun would use Pistols, whereas swinging a baseball bat would use Clubs. 

If you don’t have the relevant Skill, apply a -2 Penalty to the result of the roll instead. If the result is equal to or greater than the target’s Defense, the Attack hits; roll damage. Other Bonuses or Penalties may be added to Attack Rolls, based on the Techniques used. (See Combat Rules for more details.)


DEFENSE MODIFIERS 

Like Difficulty Modifiers, Defense Modifiers are applied to the target’s Defense when making an Attack Roll, and are often situational. Common Defense Modifiers include aiming, visibility penalties, and cover. 


ATTACK BONUSES & PENALTIES 

Some weapons are more accurate than others and apply a Bonus directly to the Attack Roll, while other weapons are less accurate than normal and suffer a Penalty to their Attack Roll. See Weapons and Equipment for examples of weapons with Attack Bonuses/Penalties. Some Techniques also might apply a Bonus or Penalty to Attack Rolls under certain circumstances.


DAMAGE 

Damage is one of the only times in the DicePunk System that you roll dice without succeeding or failing. To roll damage, roll the number of d6 indicated and add them up. That is how much Health the target loses. For much more in-depth rules on damage, death, and healing, see Combat Rules.


CONTESTS 

When two characters are directly opposing one another, a Contest is called for. The most common are Attribute Contests – situations where two characters are using the same Attribute to achieve opposite ends. Skill Contests can also occur – car chases being the most likely example. 

Some Contest Examples: 

To resolve a Contest, each player (or one player and the GM) should roll 1d6 and add the relevant Attribute (plus the relevant Skill Bonus, if applicable). The character with the higher result wins the Contest. In the event of a tie, reroll until the tie is resolved.


ADDITIONAL RULES

Let's be honest: depending on how robust a world simulation we want this to be, we could write many more "general case” rules for many more things.

For instance, we all know that people need to eat, drink, and breathe, and not being able to do any of those for various amounts of time is really quite bad for you. We also know that being burned, frozen, or drowned for any significant amount of time will cause people to die; that extended exposure to the elements, inclement weather, extreme heat, or extreme cold can be very harmful. If we wanted to focus more on creating a general reality simulator, we could shed ink on rules for these things, but we choose not to do so for two reasons.

Firstly, all of the environmental realities mentioned above might be largely tangential or even irrelevant to the subject matter of your game. Certainly, they are probably edge cases that won't come up with great frequency.

Secondly, in light of the above, I trust the ability of GMs to make appropriate and consistent ad hoc rulings using common sense when these things do come up. Alternatively, feel free to write and incorporate your own house rules to fill in some of these gaps.


CHARACTER CREATION 

Stats, Skills, special powers, and equipment – all of these things are really fun, and we spent a fair amount of time on them, but they're not the most important thing that makes up a great character. Who your character is and what your character wants, what your character is or is not willing to do to get what they want, and how that changes over time is even more important than what your character can do. 

So, right now, if you're considering a new character, come up with a concept for that character to define him or her, without referring to the character's stats. A good concept can be summed up in a few words and expanded on greatly later. Talking to your GM about the game he or she wants to run will help you get a feel for what character concepts are appropriate for that particular milieu. 

We recommend that character concepts and their associated exposition (i.e. "backstory") not be complicated at character creation. Where your character is going is more important than where they’ve been, and – like in any good fiction – details of your character's past should be revealed anew over the course of the story, rather than all that once at the beginning. 

Note that stereotypes do not generally make very interesting characters, but are almost always useful jumping-off-points for building a character. 

Once you have a basic concept, spend a little time fleshing it out by creating the details of your character’s personality, appearance, relationships and personal history. You can decide where they’re from, but the GM will decide where they are at present to fit the story.

Once your character is a complete person, assign them a name and any other relevant details. Then, you can assign stats using the process described below. Alternatively, you’re free to create a character’s stats first, and then build a person around the numbers, but this can tend to result in somewhat wooden characters. 

CHARACTER CREATION SUMMARY

1. Determine Character Name and Character Concept

2. Use the Campaign Power Level selected by the GM.

3. Spend Attribute Points on four Main Attributes.

3a. (Arbitrarily determine Attractiveness, if desired.)

4. Determine Special (Derived) Attributes

5. Spend Skill Picks

6. Choose starting combat Techniques.

7. Spend Weapon Picks and Starting Cash on Equipment.

8. Finalize Character Name and Character Concept.


CAMPAIGN POWER LEVEL 

Roleplaying games are storytelling tools and reality simulators. While words like “campaign” and “power level” certainly resonate with roleplaying’s roots in tabletop wargaming, what this choice is really all about is what kind of story you want to use the DicePunk System to tell and what flavor of reality you want it to simulate. 

These factors will change from campaign to campaign, but once a GM decides on them for a given campaign, they shouldn’t be changed over the course of that campaign. Additionally, all PCs should absolutely be created at the same power level, so the GM and the players need to get on the same page about this before character generation begins in earnest. 

If you’re the GM, you should choose the Realistic/Literary Power Level if you want to run a gritty, low-level campaign where combat is extra lethal, failure is not uncommon, and the capabilities of human beings cleave closely to their real world equivalents. If you want to run an action-packed, over-the-top campaign where people are dodging bullets and jumping out of explosions, and where the laws of biology and physics are really more like suggestions, you should choose the Comic Book/Anime Power Level. If you want something somewhere in between, or you’re just not sure, the Cinematic (Default) Power Level is the best choice for you. 

If you’re familiar with Phantasm(2010), you know that it uses a modified version of this table where character power varies even more widely with “Badass Tier”. If you’re familiar with Psionics, you’ll notice that Espers are built at the default Cinematic (30 AP) power level, but with only one Technique Pick. 

Campaign Power Level

Starting AP

Starting Technique Picks

Base Unarmed Damage

Realistic/Literary

20

One

Strength (Subdual)

Cinematic (Default)

30

Will/2 (Round Up)

1d6 + Strength (Subdual)

Comic Book/Anime

40

Will

2d6 + Strength (Subdual)

 


ATTRIBUTES 

Not all people are created equal. Some people are just more physically fit or mentally agile than others. You could roll dice to determine the genetic makeup of characters and, in fact, it might be more accurate to do so, but it’s less fun for everyone when the player characters in a roleplaying game aren’t created on even footing. 

For this reason, the DicePunk System gives you a pool of points with which to buy your Attributes, determined by theCampaign Power Level. Players are free to spend this pool of points however they please, resulting in diverse characters that are equal but different. 

Other roleplaying games have LOTS of statistics to keep track of, usually between six and twelve. The DicePunk System has only FOUR Main Attributes (although there are some optional and derived statistics to track). 


MAIN ATTRIBUTES 

Strength: Your character’s strength and toughness.

Speed: Your character’s raw physical speed and agility/dexterity; linked to many Skills.

Wits: Measures intelligence, mental speed, memory, sensory acuity, defense, Skills known.

Will: Your character’s courage and willpower. 

The DicePunk System doesn’t track the following characteristics:

Charisma/Attractiveness: Your charisma and persuasiveness will be based primarily on how you roleplay your character and the situation at hand. If you want to play an ultra-suave character, be suave. Your character can be as attractive or unattractive as you want, or you can simply roll 1d6 let the result determine your attractiveness, with 6 being a supermodel and 1 being some kind of hideous deformed freak. Ask which your GM would prefer. 

Wisdom: As far as the DicePunk System is concerned, “wisdom” is really common sense. Since no statistic on the character sheet is going to stop your character from doing dumb things, this one is really up to you. If you want to roleplay a wise character, make wise decisions. If you wind up making stupid decisions, your character isn’t all that wise, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing (if you can get out alive) and almost always makes for good drama and storytelling. 

All of your Main Attributes are rated from one to ten (although non-human characters and monsters may, rarely, have Attributes of above ten). In the DicePunk System ratings from one to six are within realistic human norms, whereas ratings above six would be considered superhuman in the real world but are possible for Hollywood humans. 

Attribute Rating

Description

1

Handicapped or disabled in some way.

2

Below average. Embarrassing.

3

Average for a normal human.

4

Above average. Decently developed.

5

Good or very good for a normal human.

6

Peak of “real” human development.

7

Heroic.

8

Legendary.

9

Super-Heroic.

10

Undeniably superhuman.


All Main Attributes begin at 0, but all players must purchase all four Attributes at least at Rating 1. The cost to purchase an Attribute varies by the rating (as shown in the following table) but is the same for all four of the Main Attributes; all Attributes are equally important. All starting characters by default have a pool of 30 Attribute Points to spend on their main four Attributes.

Attribute Rating

Point Cost to Purchase

1

1 (Mandatory)

2

2 (Strongly recommended.)

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

8

8

10

9

12

10

15

 


SPECIAL (DERIVED) ATTRIBUTES 

Besides the Main Attributes, there are several more Special Attributes that are derived from them. 

Health: Measures how much punishment a character can take before they’re down for the count.

{Knockout Threshold}Determines when a character will lose consciousness from pain/shock.

{Death Threshold}: The final word on what is or isn’t survivable for the character.

Defense: Measures how hard the character is to hit in combat.

Initiative: Determines the order in which the characters act in combat. 

Special Attribute

Formula To Determine

Health

Strength × 6

Knockout Threshold

10 - Will

Death Threshold

0 - Strength

Defense

3 + Wits

Initiative

(Speed × 2) + 2d6

 


SKILLS 

Skills represent learned abilities and trained talents that characters were not born with, but have acquired over the course of their lives. You have only (Wits × 2) Skill Picks to spend

Skills that have been learned and developed have three levels: ApprenticeExpert, and Master. Skills that characters do not have AT ALL are considered Untrained. Skills that characters have TRAINED in but not advanced at all will be covered elsewhere. 

Skill Level

# of Picks To Learn

Benefits

Apprentice

1

When using the Skill, you need only roll equal to or less than the Linked Attribute + 1.

Expert

3

When using the Skill, you need only roll equal to or less than the Linked Attribute + 2.

Master

5

When using the Skill, you need only roll equal to or less than the Linked Attribute + 4.

  

The DicePunk System neither has an exhaustive, detailed list of in-game Skills to choose from, NOR includes in-depth descriptions of what each Skill can and cannot do. 

The DicePunk System abstains from the former (exhaustive Skill lists) in the name of creative expression; if our list does not contain a Skill you want, you can freely create any Skills you think your character would have, from Guitar to Demolitions. Just make sure that you, your GM, and all of the other players agree that the new Skill is fair. We have provided many example Skills to give you an idea of how specific Skills should be. A notable exception is Combat Skills, which we have specifically mapped out and balanced. 

We have abstained from the latter (detailed Skill descriptions) in the name of the reality of GM fiat. In any roleplaying game, it will be ultimately up to the referee to determine what Skills can and cannot do in any given situation; the DicePunk System recognizes this, and leaves that call to the GM from the start. 

The following list gives several usable sample Skills – you can pick from these Skills or use these as guidelines to create your own. Again, Combat Skills should stay as is; there is no reason to create your own Combat Skills. 

The following list can help you decide which Attributes that Skills you create will be linked to; every Skill must have aLinked Attribute. Lastly, it is important to note that Linked Attributes are much less important for Combat Skills than for Non-combat Skills. 


SAMPLE SKILLS 

Skill Name

Linked Attribute

Sample Task

Combat Skill?

Automatics

Strength

Fire an Uzi; Fire an AK-47.

Yes.

Automotive Repair

Wits

Diagnose and repair a car that breaks down.

No.

Awareness

Wits

Find a hidden passageway; Avoid an ambush.

No.

Bike

Speed

Navigate around a crashed 18-wheeler.

Sometimes.

Blades

Speed

Stab a foe with a switch-blade.

Yes.

Brawling

Strength

Throw a killer uppercut; Dispatch an opponent with a broken bottle or a steel folding chair.

Yes.

Calculus

Wits

Find the total flux of an electromagnetic field.

No.

Chemistry

Wits

Make explosives from household chemicals.

No.

Climbing

Strength

Scale a building.

No.

Clubs

Strength

Subdue an enemy with a riot baton.

Yes.

Computers

Wits.

Hack into a restricted database.

No.

Cooking

Wits

Prepare a delicious breakfast.

No.

Demolitions

Wits

Defuse a bomb.

No.

Drawing

Speed

Accurately sketch an arcane sigil for later reproduction.

No.

Drive

Wits

Escape from a car chase.

Sometimes.

Electronics

Wits

Fix a broken generator; hotwire a car.

No.

First Aid

Wits

Disinfect a gunshot; Sew an open wound shut.

No.

German

Wits

Speak and understand German.

No.

Guitar

Speed

“Stairway to Heaven”.

No.

Gunsmith

Wits

Modify an AK-47 assault rifle.

No.

Heavy Weapons

Strength

Fire an M-60; Fire a rocket launcher.

Yes.

Intimidation

Will

Force a human opponent to back down without violence.

No.

Latin

Wits

Read and write Latin.

No.

Leadership

Will

Convince the cowed test subjects to fight by your side.

No.

Locksmith

Speed

Pick a padlock.

No.

Negotiation

Wits

Complete a drug deal.

No.

Pilot

Wits

Land a prop plane; Control a helicopter.

No.

Pistols

Speed

Fire a 9mm Handgun.

Yes.

Rifles

Wits

Fire a shotgun; Fire a sniper rifle

Yes.

Security

Wits

Bypass an alarm system; Set a trap.

No.

Stand Up Comedy

Wits

Make someone laugh in an inappropriate situation.

No.

Stealth

Speed

Sneak out of your quarters unseen.

No.

Subterfuge

Wits

Fast-talk your way past a security guard.

No.

Swimming

Strength

Avoid drowning.

No.

Throwing Weapons

Strength

Throw a shuriken; Throw a grenade.

Yes.

 


BASIC TRAINING 

In addition to Developed Skills, all DicePunk System characters are Trained in a number of additional Skills equal to their Wits. While being Trained is not quite as good as being an Apprentice, it is much better than being Untrained

Skill Level

Benefits

Untrained

NONE. When attempting to use the Skill, you must roll equal to or under the Linked Attribute - 2. If the Skill is a Combat Skill, make your Attack Roll at a -2 Penalty.

Trained

When using this Skill, treat it as a standard Attribute Check of the Linked Attribute. If the Skill is a Combat Skill, just roll 2d6, and do not add or subtract anything.

 


TECHNIQUES 

Call them feats, talents, moves, maneuvers, or whatever you like – just please don’t call them Skills or Attributes, for the sake of clarity. Techniques are how your character kicks ass. Techniques make combat exciting, varied, and dynamic, rather than a boring attack-fest. 

The number of Technique Picks a character starts with depends on the Campaign Power Level

Campaign Power Level

Starting Technique Picks

Realistic/Literary

One

Cinematic (Default)

Will/2 (Round Up)

Comic Book/Anime

Will

 

 Additional Technique Picks can be purchased with XP after character creation: see Character Advancement. Techniques cost one Pick each, unless otherwise specified on these tables. “Advanced Techniques” require another Technique as a prerequisite and/or cost more than one Pick; they may or may not be available at Character Generation at the GM’s discretion. All prerequisites must still be met. 


EQUIPMENT 

There are games where every piece of gear is kept track of in fastidious and exacting detail; this is not one of those games. Depending on your GM, starting weapons, armor, and vehicles are important, along with the gasoline and ammo you’ll need to keep them running, and maybe the medical supplies you’ll need to keep you on your feet. Everything else can be handily abstracted by the GM. Starting characters are assumed to begin with any miscellaneous gear they need (accommodation, food, clothing, a cell phone, etc.). Players receive starting weapons and vehicles based on their level of training in their respective Skills. Some high-quality weapons and vehicles take more than one Pick. For a BIG list of individual weapons and other gear, see the Equipment Lists page. 

Skill Level

Weapon/Vehicle Picks

Example

Trained or less.

Nothing

NA

Apprentice

1

An Apprentice of Blades could start with a switchblade. An Apprentice of Drive could start with a Honda Civic.

Expert

2

An Expert of Pistols could start with two Glocks, or one Desert Eagle. An Expert of Bike could start with a badass Harley or with two wimpy Vespas.

Master

4

A Master of Automatics could start with a Tec-9, a Mac-11, and two Micro-Uzis, or with two AK-47 assault rifles, or one Steyr-Aug assault rifle and one Micro-Uzi. A Master of Pilot could start with an attack helicopter. A Master of Blades could start with four switchblades, two rapiers, or a katana.

 


STARTING CASH 

All characters start with (Wits)d6 × $100 in starting cash that can be used to purchase additional weapons, ammunition, and incidental gear. Starting cash left unspent at the end of character creation comes into game as cash-in-hand. Additional weapons and gear can be found over the course of the game.


STARTING TECHNIQUES 

Technique Name

Prerequisites

Use Limits

Benefits

Ambidexterity

Expert or higher in Blades or Clubs

 –

You can wield two (reasonably small) melee weapons in combat, allowing you to make one additional Melee Attack per Attack Action. Both Melee Attacks must be on the same target. If you choose to Attack twice, each Attack is at a -1 Penalty.

Batter Up

Strength 5+

 –

When armed with a two-handed weapon, you can spend a Full Turn Action to make a Melee Attack at -2 to hit. Treat your Strength as twice what it actually is to determine the damage of this Attack.

Blitzkrieg

Speed 5+

 –

You can Attack and Move, or give up your Attack Action to Move twice in a Turn. (Normally, characters can only Move and then Attack, not the other way around.)

Boom!Headshot

 –

 –

When using any pistol, rifle, or shotgun, you can declare that you are aiming for the head. Aiming for a specific target is a Move Action, which must be followed by an Attack Action to fire; hence, using Boom!Headshot is a Full Turn Action. Your Attack Roll is at a -2 Penalty, but you deal double damage if you hit.

Bull’s Eye

Wits 5+

 –

As Trick Shot, but for use with non-explosive throwing weapons, such as throwing knives and shuriken.

Critical Attack

 –

 –

When you roll a natural 12 on an Attack Roll, you automatically hit, and make a separate Attack Roll. If that Attack Roll would hit, your Attack does double damage.

Dodge

Speed 5+

 –

You can give up a Combat Turn to take evasive action: make a Speed Check when next attacked. If you succeed, the Attack misses you. If you are Attacked before your Turn in a given Combat Round, you can give up your next Action to reflexively Dodge (you must declare this before the Attack Roll against you is made), but if you have already acted in a Combat Turn, you cannot Dodge during that Turn. If you Dodge a Grapple attempt, you don’t need to make a Speed Check – your Speed Check is considered to have automatically succeeded.

In The Face!

 –

 –

As Boom!Headshot, but for use with non-explosive throwing weapons, such as throwing knives and shuriken.

Kneecapper

 –

 –

When using any pistol, rifle, or shotgun, you can use a Move Action to aim for the target’s kneecap, immediately followed by an Attack Action to take the shot. The Attack Roll is made at a -2 Penalty. If you hit, the target can only move one yard per Turn until healed; the Attack does normal damage.

Longshot

Wits 6+

 –

Double the range increments of all firearms you use.

Point Blank

 –

 –

Attacks made with firearms against targets one yard away or closer receive a +1 Bonus and deal +1d6 damage.

Reposition

Speed 6+

 –

You may choose to reroll your Initiative between Combat Rounds. (Normally, you are stuck with the Initiative you rolled at the beginning of combat.)

Trick Shot

Speed 5+

 –

You can spend a Move Action to Take Aim, and take a -2 Penalty on a subsequent Attack Roll to hit a very small, specific, target. Traditionally, this can be used to knock a weapon out of a humanoid enemy’s hands, but it could also be used to hit difficult targets, like the tires of a car. If this Attack hits a weapon, the weapon is destroyed or knocked 2d6 yards away, at the GM’s discretion.

 


ADVANCED TECHNIQUES 

Advanced Technique

# of Picks

Prerequisites

Use Limit/
Cost

Benefits

Blade Dance

3

Blades Expert

3 Health

You can divide the damage from a normal Blades Attack however you choose between the primary target and any number of other targets that are within Speed yards. Blade Dance can’t be combined with other Techniques; you must declare that you are using Blade Dance before making the Attack Roll.

Bullet Time

1

Dodge

2 Health

By spending 2 Health, you can add +4 to your Speed for the purpose of any Dodge Test you make versus a Ranged Attack.

Counter Attack

3

Expert in Blades, Clubs, or Brawling

 –

Whenever you’re hit with a Melee Attack, you get a free Melee Attack against the attacker at a -1 Penalty at the end of the Turn in which they hit you.

Dual Strike

1

Ambidexterity

Daily

Once per day, you can Attack with two equipped melee weapons at a +4 Bonus instead of the usual -1 Penalty. Both attacks must be made against the same target. If using Frenzy, instead you make FOUR attacks at a +2 Bonus.

Equilibrium

1

John Wu Special

Daily

Once per day, you can fire two pistols and receive a +4 Bonus to each Attack. You can split these attacks up however you see fit among available targets. If using Frenzy, you make FOUR attacks at a +2 Bonus.

Frenzy

2

Blitzkrieg

 –

You can give up your Move Action to Attack twice in a Turn. Each Attack is made at a -2 Penalty.

Impaler

2

Strength 7+; Batter Up

3 Health

When armed with any melee weapon capable of penetrating an opponent’s body (such as a broken pool cue or a sword), you can spend 3 Health and a Full Turn Action to make a Melee Attack at -2 to hit. This attack does triple damage if it hits, and the target may not Counter Attack.

Improved Critical Attack

2

Critical Attack

 –

Whenever you roll a natural 12 on an Attack Roll, you automatically deal double damage.

Killing Hands

1

Expert Brawler; Strength 7+

 –

If you choose, your Unarmed Attacks can inflict lethal damage instead of subdual damage.

Lethal Strikes

1

Killing Hands

 –

 Your Unarmed Attacks deal +1d6 extra damage. You may pick Lethal Strikes up to three times, gaining this benefit each time. Note, this Technique is more appropriate for campaigns at the Comic Book/Anime Power Level. Inclusion of this Technique is at the GM’s discretion.

Matrix

1

Dodge

2 Health

By spending 2 Health, you can add +4 to your Speed for the purpose of any Dodge Test you make versus a Melee Attack.

Neck Snapper

3

Killing Hands; Lethal Strikes; Critical Attack

5 Health

If you roll a natural twelve on an Unarmed Attack Roll, your target’s Health is immediately lowered to its death threshold. Some powerful enemies may be immune to this instant-kill ability.

One-Punch Knockout

2

Expert Brawler; Critical Attack

 –

If you roll a natural twelve on an Unarmed Attack Roll, your target’s Health is immediately lowered to its K.O. threshold, if it has one.

Sniper

3

Longshot and either Boom!Headshot, Kneecapper, or Trick Shot

 –

When using a scoped weapon (such as a sniper rifle), ignore the to-hit Penalties for making Boom!Headshot, Kneecapper, and Trick Shot Attacks.

Stealth Kill

2

Master of Stealth

 –

If you are undetected (i.e. if you win a contest where you roll 1d6 + Speed + Stealth versus an enemy’s 1d6 + Wits + Awareness) at the start of a combat and armed with a one-handed melee weapon (such as a combat knife or blackjack), your Attack hits automatically for double damage.

Too Damn Fast

1

Reposition; Speed 7+

 –

Add 1d6 to your Initiative roll. You may pick Too Damn Fast up to three times, gaining this benefit each time.

 


WEAPONS AND EQUIPMENT 

This section includes the descriptions, prices, and game statistics for a basic and generic smattering of the weapons, drugs, and other equipment that might be used or encountered by PCs in a DicePunk System campaign. 

Weapons include improvised and not-so-improvised melee weapons and, of course, a selection of firearms. (Astute readers may notice that the selection of firearms presented in Phantasm(2010) evokes more of a rural, grindhouse horror flavor, and the selection of firearms presented in Psionics evokes more of a modern, military, espionage feel.) 

One game statistic not listed here for firearms is range; the firearm range table appears here. Other equipment includes useful things like body armor and first aid kits. 

Prices for most weapons and equipment are based loosely on common prices for those items in the early 21st century, with a fair amount of room for creative license. 

Remember that, at character creation, you get: 

1 Free Weapon Pick for any Combat Skill that you’re an Apprentice in.

2 Free Weapon Picks for any Combat Skill that you’re an Expert in.

4 Free Weapon Picks for any Combat Skill that you’ve Mastered.

Better and harder to find weapons cost more than one Pick, and the number of Picks a weapon costs will be indicated next to its price. 

Permanent possessions, such as vehicles and homes, are not included here. Nor are mundane possessions, such as cellular phones, clothing, and personal computers. Your GM should let you begin with these for free at the start of the campaign, but that doesn't mean you'll be allowed to keep them. Some characters wind up either fugitives – living hand to mouth on the run, driving what they can steal and crashing wherever seems safe for the night – or organizational pawns, living with whatever's been issued to them.


MELEE WEAPONS 

All one-handed melee weapons add ½ Strength (round up) to the listed damage, unless otherwise noted. All two handed melee weapons add Strength to the listed damage, unless otherwise noted. 

Weapon

Hands Needed

Skill Used

Damage

Notes

Picks (Price)

Small Knife/Scalpel

One

Blades

5 + Speed

Do not add bonus damage from Strength.

2 ($65)

Riot Baton

One

Clubs

2d6

 –

1 ($20)

Pistol Whip

One

Brawling

1d6

 –

As firearm

Rifle Butt

Two

Brawling

2d6

 –

As firearm

Baseball Bat/Chair Leg

Two

Clubs

2d6

 –

1 ($10-$100)

Combat Knife, Hatchet, or Machete

One

Blades

1d6 + 4

 –

2 ($40)

Stungun/Taser Baton/Cattle Prod

One

Clubs

4d6

Nonlethal damage.

2 ($100)

Crowbar

Two

Clubs

1d6 + Strength

Add bonus damage from Strength on top of the listed damage.

2 ($75)

Axe/Pickaxe

Two

Blades or Clubs

3d6

 –

2 ($100)

Katana

Two

Blades

3d6 + Speed

+1 to Attack Rolls with this weapon.

4 ($5,000)

 


LISTS OF FIREARMS 


RATE OF FIRE

Rate of Fire

Description

Single Shot (S)

The weapon can fire only one shot per Combat Turn, even if the character can make more than one Attack, such as by using the Frenzy Technique.

Semi-Automatic (SA)

The weapon can fire two shots per Combat Turn, but only if the character firing it has more than one Attack, such as by using the Frenzy Technique.

Burst Fire (B)

The weapon can use one Attack to fire a three-round burst.

Fully Automatic (FA)

The weapon can either fire a full burst or provide covering fire. In either case, the weapon can make only one Attack in a Turn if used on full auto.

Select Fire

The weapon’s wielder can switch between two to three of the following modes by using a Free Action: SA, B, and/or FA. True select fire weapons will be designated with a slash between firing rates, whereas weapons with two “effective” ROF can simply fire a few rounds with a quick press of the trigger will use the word “or” to divide firing rates.

 


RELOAD TIME BY CAPACITY TYPE 

Rate of Fire

Reload Time

Clip [C]

One Move Action to change clips. Loading rounds into an empty clip, however, is a Full Turn Action to load Speed rounds into the clip.

Cylinder [Cy]

If using a Speedloader, an Attack Action allows you to fully reload a cylinder. Otherwise, you may only load ½ Speed (round up) rounds with an Attack Action.

Internal Magazine [M]

Three Options: #1: Use an Attack Action to reload ½ Speed (round up) rounds. #2: Use a Full Turn Action to fully reload the magazine. #3: Make a successful Speed Check to load ½ Speed (round up) rounds as a Move Action. Failure indicates no rounds loaded.

Belt [Blt]

10 - Speed (minimum 1) Full Turn Actions. If a character assists you with changing belts, this can be done in one Full Turn Action from each of you.

Break [Br]

One Attack Action or a Move Action and a successful Speed Check; failure indicates no rounds loaded.

Drum [D]

One Move Action to remove the previous drum and one Attack Action to attach a fresh drum.

 


PISTOLS 

All of these weapons are used with the Pistols Combat Skill. All of these weapons can be used with one hand, unless otherwise indicated. 

Weapon

Damage

Rate of Fire

Capacity (Type)

Notes

Picks

Price

Holdout Revolver (i.e. Colt Detective Special) [.38 Special]

1d6 + 4

S

6 [Cy]

+2 DM to Stealth or Sleight of Hand rolls to conceal this weapon

1

~$429

Holdout Automatic (i.e. Walther PPK) [.32 ACP]

1d6 + 3

SA

8 [C]

+2 DM to Stealth or Sleight of Hand rolls to conceal this weapon.

1

~$450

Light Pistol (i.e. Glock 17) [9mm Parabellum]

2d6

SA

17 [C]

 –

1

~$500

Taser

5d6

S

1 [Br]

Only works at Short Range. Nonlethal damage only.

2

$500

Heavy Pistol (i.e. Colt M1911a1) [.45 ACP]

2d6 + 3

SA

7 [C]

+1 to Attack Rolls with this weapon

2

~$800

Heavy Revolver (i.e. Colt Python) [.357 Magnum]

5d6

S

6 [Cy]

 –

2

~$1,000

Mini-Crossbow

3d6

S

1 [Br]

This weapon is effectively silenced.

2

$100

Tranquilizer Pistol

1

S

1 [Br]

Plus toxin effect. This weapon is effectively silenced. Compressed air canister is good for 50 shots.

2

$500

Semi-Auto Hand Cannon (i.e. Desert Eagle) [.50 AE]

4d6 + 2

SA

7 [C]

Additional -1 Penalty to second Attack in the Round when making two Attacks in a Round with this weapon. Requires two hands to use.

3

~$1,500

Tactical Heavy Pistol (i.e. HK Mk. 23 SOCOM ) [.45 ACP]

2d6 + 3

SA

12 [C]

+1 to Attack Rolls with this weapon; this weapon comes with a Laser Sight and Silencer

3

$1,995

 


AUTOMATICS 

These weapons are used with the Automatics Combat Skill. These weapons cannot be used one handed unless otherwise indicated. 

Weapon

Damage

Rate of Fire

Capacity (Type)

Notes

Picks

Price

Machine Pistol (i.e. Tec-9) [9mm]

2d6 – 1

SA [FA]

20 [C]

This weapon can be used in one hand. Attacks with this weapon receive a -1 Penalty.

1

$300

Light SMG (i.e. Uzi) [9mm]

2d6

FA

40 [C]

This weapon features a folding stock which, when deployed, reduces Recoil Penalties by 1.

1

$3,000

Burst Pistol (i.e. Beretta 93R ) [9mm Parabellum]

2d6

B

20 [C]

This weapon features a folding stock which, when deployed, reduces Recoil Penalties by 1. This weapon can be used in one hand when the stock is folded and not deployed.

2

$2,400

Soviet Assault Rifle (i.e. AK-47) [7.62x39mm]

3d6 + 3

SA/FA

30 [C]

 –

2

$600

American Assault Rifle (i.e. M4/M16) [5.56 mm]

3d6

SA/B/FA

30 [C]

Attacks made with this weapon are at a +1 Bonus.

2

$3,000

Tactical Light SMG (i.e. HK MP5) [9mm Parabellum]

2d6

SA/B/FA

30 [C]

Attacks made with this weapon are at a +1 Bonus. This weapon features a folding stock which, when deployed, reduces Recoil Penalties by 1.

2

$5,000

Tactical Heavy SMG (i.e. UMP-45) [.45 ACP]

3d6

SA/B/FA

25 [C]

Attacks made with this weapon are at a +1 Bonus. This weapon features a folding stock which, when deployed, reduces Recoil Penalties by 1.

3

$4,400

Personal Defense Weapon (i.e. FN P90) [5.7x28mm]

2d6 + 2 (+10 vs. ranged armor)

SA/B/FA

50 [C]

Attacks made with this weapon are at a +1 Bonus. This weapon overcomes the first 10 points of ranged damage cut from worn armor.

3

$2800

Bullpup Assault Rifle (i.e. FAMAS) [5.56mm]

3d6

SA/B/FA

30 [C]

This weapon comes with a Military Scope.

3

$4,000

High Capacity Assault Rifle (i.e. Steyr Aug) [5.56 mm]

3d6

SA/B/FA

42 [C]

This weapon comes with a Military Scope.

3

$5,000

 


RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS 

These weapons are used with the Rifles Combat Skill. These weapons cannot be used one-handed unless otherwise indicated. 

Weapon

Damage

Rate of Fire

Capacity (Type)

Notes

Picks

Price

Hunting Rifle (i.e. Remington Model 700) [.223]

3d6 + 3

S

4 [M]

This weapon features a scope.

1

$500

Pump Shotgun (i.e. Ithaca 37) [12 Gauge]

4d6

S

4 [M]

 –

1

$300

Semi-Auto Rifle (i.e. Armalite AR-15) [5.56 mm]

3d6

SA

20 [C]

This weapon receives a +1 Bonus to Attack.

1

$1,000

Crossbow

6d6

S

1 [Br]

This weapon features a scope and is effectively silenced. Uses hunting rifle ranges.

2

$500.00

Big Game Rifle (i.e. Remington Model 30) [.30-06]

5d6

S

5 [M]

This weapon features a scope.

2

$750

Tranquilizer Rifle

1

S

1 [Br]

Plus toxin effect. This weapon features a scope, and is effectively silenced. Compressed air canister is good for 50 shots.

2

$1000

Sawn-Off Double-Barreled Shotgun [12 Gauge]

4d6

S or B

2 [Br]

This weapon can fire both barrels at once for a “Burst” Attack.

2

$1,750

Tactical Shotgun (i.e. Mossberg 590) [12 Gauge]

4d6

S

8 [M]

 –

3

$600

Bolt Action Sniper Rifle (i.e. CheyTac Intervention) [.408 Chey Tac]

5d6 + 6

S

7 [C]

This weapon receives a +1 Bonus to Attack and features a military scope and silencer.

4

$10,995

Semi-Auto Sniper Rifle (i.e. Dragunov) [7.62x54mm]

5d6

SA

10 [C]

This weapon features a military scope.

4

$10,000

 


HEAVY WEAPONS 

These weapons are all used with the Heavy Weapons Combat Skill. None of them can ever be used one-handed. These weapons can only be used by characters with Strength 5 or higher. 

Weapon

Damage

Rate of Fire

Capacity (Type)

Notes

Picks

Price

RPG [85mm Rocket]

10d6

S

1 [Br]

This weapon’s damage follows the normal rules for grenade blast radius.

1

$3,000

Light Machine Gun (i.e. L86 LSW) [5.56mm]

3d6

FA

30 [C]

This weapon features a scope and receives a +1 Bonus to Attack.

2

<Pick Only>

Standalone Grenade Launcher (i.e. M79) [40mm Grenades]

8d6

S

1 [Br]

Damage varies with the ammo loaded; standard rounds follow usual rules for grenade blast.

2

<Pick Only>

Soviet Machine Gun (i.e. RPD) [7.62x39mm]

3d6 + 3

FA

100 [D]

 –

3

<Pick Only>

Under-Barrel Mounted Grenade Launcher (i.e. M203) [40mm Grenades]

8d6

S

1 [M]

Damage varies with the ammo loaded; standard rounds follow usual rules for grenade blast. This weapon or one just like it can be affixed to nearly any assault rifle with a successful Gunsmith Test.

3

<Pick Only>

Medium Machine Gun (i.e. M60E3) [7.62x51mm]

4d6

FA

250 [Blt]

This weapon features a bipod which, when deployed, reduces Recoil Penalties by 2.

3

$8,000

Anti-Tank Rifle (i.e. Barrett M82) [.50 BMG]

9d6

SA

10 [C]

This weapon features a military scope.

4

$18,000

 


GUN TRIVIA 

Colt Detective Special 

First appearing in 1927, the Colt Detective Special is a carbon steel framed double-action short-barreled revolver, a class of firearms known to gun enthusiasts as “snubnosed", “snubbies", or “belly guns". As the name “Detective Special" suggests, this class of gun was used as a concealed weapon by plainclothes police detectives. The Detective Special was the first premium grade swing-out revolver designed from the outset to be carried concealed and capable of chambering the .38 Special, a high powered cartridge in the 1920s. This weapon was produced through 1995, and the stats are representative of other small, concealed-carry revolvers. This weapon or something like it is very likely to be the sidearm of police and private detectives. 

Walther PPK 

Available in one form or another since 1929, this is a blowback operated, semi-automatic pocket pistol well suited for concealed carry. Functionally identical to any number of other holdout pistols, the Walther PPK has the unique distinction of being James Bond’s gun. 

Glock 17 

Just one in a long series of semi-automatic pistols designed and produced by Glock GmbH, located in Deutsch-Wagram, Austria. Glock controls the majority of the law enforcement market share in the United States. This is the weapon most police officers will be using, especially state troopers and local cops in urban and rural areas. 

Taser 

A Taser is an electroshock weapon that uses electrical current to disrupt voluntary muscle control. Rather than mere pain compliance, the Taser allegedly causes total “neuromuscular incapacitation" using electro-muscular disruption technology. Tasers are nonlethal weapons used by police to subdue fleeing, belligerent, or potentially dangerous suspects, in the place of using more lethal weapons. A Taser inflicts nonlethal damage, uses pistol ranges, and does not work outside of short range. 

Mini-Crossbow 

For civilian hobbyists, mini-crossbow pistols are perfect for target practice and small game hunting. Typically, mini-crossbows are constructed of impact-resistant ABS with an 80-lb. draw eight fiberglass blow; some use hardened steel parts instead. The crossbow includes adjustable sights for precision accuracy. Agents and operatives of the powers that be sometimes use mini-crossbows with injection bolts for assassination and capture missions (varying the chemical payload as needed) due to the fact that the weapon is totally silent, even more than a silenced pistol. The mini crossbow must be reloaded after every shot. 

Colt M1911a1 

The most iconic handgun ever made, used by everyone from Humphrey Bogart's Sam Spade to the American GI, the Colt .45 automatic pistol was developed in 1911 by John Browning and remained the primary sidearm of U.S. armed forces until its replacement in 1985 by the M9. The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated handgun chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. In total, the United States procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols during its service life. Incredibly, the practically antediluvian M1911a1 is still preferred and used by Special Forces units, for its reliability and incredible stopping power. If you’ve seen a handgun in a movie, there’s a 50% chance that it was a Colt M1911a1 or a clone thereof. Statistically, M1911 clones, like Springfield Armory replicas and the AMT Hardballer, are identical to the original weapon. 

Colt Python 

Developed in 1955, Colt Python is a double action revolver chambered for the powerful .357 Magnum cartridge built on Colt's large I-frame. Pythons have a reputation for accuracy, smooth trigger pull and a tight cylinder lock-up. Some consider them to be among the finest revolvers ever made. This intimidating weapon is still used by some badass highway patrols throughout the country. 

Tranquilizer Pistol 

These compressed air dart-projectors are usually used for animal control. This one is built on the frame of the Mk. 22 Mod 0 “Hush Puppy", a slide-locked Navy Seal modification of the S&W Model 39 pistol. The barrel has been re-bored to fire breech-loaded .50 caliber dart rounds, and the magazine well reconfigured to hold a compressed air canister (good for 50 shots). The weapon must be reloaded with a new dart after every shot. 

Desert Eagle 

If you saw a handgun in a movie, and it wasn’t an M1911 or M1911 clone, it was probably a Desert Eagle, most likely outfitted with a tacky chrome finish and gigantic laser aiming module. Far less common in real life than in the movies, the inimitable Desert Eagle is almost certainly too much firepower for any given situation. The Desert Eagle is a large-bore gas-operated semi-automatic pistol designed by Magnum Research in the U.S., and manufactured primarily in Israel by IMI. This monster has been available since 1985. 

HK Mk. 23 Mod 0 

The Heckler & Koch MK23 Mod 0 is a handgun consisting of a match grade semi-automatic pistol, a laser aiming module (LAM), and suppressor. It was adopted by the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) for special operations units in the 1990s. While the designation applies to the complete system, it's also commonly used in reference to the pistol component itself. A deadly and effective weapon, designed in 1991. 

Tec-9 

Produced between 1985 and 1994, the Intratec TEC-DC9 (also known simply as the TEC-9) is a blowback-operated, semi-automatic firearm, chambered in 9×19mm Parabellum, and classified by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms as a handgun. It is made of inexpensive molded polymers and stamped steel parts. The TEC-9 was not accepted by any armed forces leading to its use as a civilian gun and eventually a crime gun, infamously associated with gang violence in south-central Los Angeles, since it can be easily and illegally converted to an automatic weapon. The TEC-9 was listed among the 19 firearms banned by name in the USA by the 1994 Federal Assault Weapons Ban. Their small size made them difficult to fire accurately in full auto, and this, when combined with their high rate of fire, made control challenging; this was a key factor in their never finding much success with the military. 

Uzi 

The Uzi (Hebrew: עוזי‎, officially cased as UZI) is a related family of open bolt, blowback-operated submachine guns; these stats represent a full-sized SMG. The Uzi was one of the first weapons to use a telescoping bolt design which allows for the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip for a shorter weapon. The Uzi has found use as a personal defense weapon by rear-echelon troops, officers, artillery troops and tankers, as well as a frontline weapon by elite light infantry assault forces. The first Uzi submachine gun was designed by Major Uziel Gal in the late 1940s. 

Beretta 93R 

Designed in 1970 and produced only until 1990, the Beretta Model 93R is a selective-fire machine pistol made by the Italian Beretta company and derived from their semi-automatic Model 92. The “R" stands for Raffica which means “burst" in Italian. The pistol was designed in the 1970s and was meant for police and military use, offering extra firepower in a small package, and is suited for concealed carry purposes such as VIP protection, or for close quarters fighting such as room-to-room searches. A selector switch and the foldable foregrip allows the pistol to fire three round bursts with each pull of the trigger for a cyclic rate of 1100 rounds per minute. The designers limited it to fixed three-round bursts to allow it to be more easily controlled. The 93R is basically a Beretta 92 series pistol, but the 93R is single action and outfitted with a muzzle brake, an optional detachable shoulder stock, and a 20-round magazine that also allows for a firmer grip. 

AK-47 

The AK-47 (or Avtomat Kalashnikova) is a selective fire, gas operated 7.62mm assault rifle developed in the Soviet Union by Mikhail Kalashnikov in the 1940s. Six decades later, the AK-47 and its variants and derivatives remain in service throughout the world. It has been manufactured in many countries and has seen service with regular armed forces as well as irregular, revolutionary and terrorist organizations worldwide. In some third world countries, an AK is available on the black market for less than fifty dollars. Designed in 1946 and still being produced. 

M4/M16 

Designed in 1957 and in service from 1964 to the present, the M16 (more formally Rifle, Caliber 5.56mm, M16) is the U.S. military designation for the ArmaLite AR-15 rifle. Colt purchased the rights to the AR-15 and currently uses that designation only for semi-automatic versions of the rifle. The M16 entered United States Army service as the M16A1 and was deployed for jungle warfare in the Republic of South Vietnam in 1963, becoming the standard US Rifle of the Vietnam War by 1969 – replacing the M14 rifle in that role. Since the Vietnam War, the M16 rifle family has been the primary infantry rifle of the U.S. military. With its variants, it has been in use by 15 NATO countries, and is the most produced firearm in its caliber. The M4 is a shorter, lightweight carbine version of the M16, which is, in terms of its stats in this game, functionally identical. 

HK MP5 

Developed in 1964 and still manufactured today, the Heckler & Koch MP5 (From Maschinenpistole 5 - German: “machine pistol model 5") is a 9mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a team of engineers from the German small arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (HK) of Oberndorf am Neckar. It is currently used by the armed forces and law enforcement units of over 40 countries, and is a mainstay of SWAT teams and special forces units. The MP5 remains one of the most widely deployed of all current submachine guns and has been developed into a family with numerous variants. 

UMP 45 

The UMP is a blowback operated, magazine-fed submachine gun firing from a closed bolt. As originally designed, the UMP is chambered for larger cartridges than other submachine guns like the MP5, to provide more stopping power against unarmored targets (with a slightly lower effective range) than the 9×19mm MP5 provides. A larger cartridge produces more recoil, and makes control more difficult in fully automatic firing. To mitigate this, the cyclic rate of fire was reduced to 600 rounds/min for the UMP45, which makes it one of the slower firing submachine guns on the market. Its predominantly polymer construction reduces both its weight and the number of parts susceptible to corrosion. When the last round of the UMP is fired, the bolt locks open, and can be released via a catch on the left side. The standard viewing sights comprise an aperture rear sight and a front ring with a vertical post. It can mount four Picatinny rails (one on top of the receiver, and one on the right, left, and the bottom of the handguard) for the attachment of accessories such as optical sights, flashlights, or laser sights. Vertical foregrips can be attached to the bottom rail for increased controllability during burst and automatic fire. 

FN P90 

The FN P90 is a selective fire personal defense weapon (PDW) designed and manufactured by FN Herstal in Belgium. The P90's name is taken from 1990, the year it was introduced. The P90 was created in response to NATO requests for a replacement for 9×19mm Parabellum firearms; it was designed as a compact but powerful firearm for vehicle crews, operators of crew-served weapons, support personnel, special forces, and counter-terrorist groups. The P90 was designed by FN in conjunction with the FN Five-SeveN pistol and FN 5.7×28mm ammunition. The P90 was developed and initially marketed as a personal defense weapon, but it could also be considered a submachine gun or compact assault rifle. Featuring a compact bullpup design with an integrated reflex sight and fully ambidextrous controls, the P90 is an unconventional weapon with a futuristic appearance. Its design incorporates several innovations such as a unique top-mounted magazine and FN's small-caliber, high-velocity 5.7×28mm ammunition. The P90 is currently in service with military and police forces in over 40 countries, such as Austria, Brazil, Canada, France, Malaysia, Poland, and the United States. In the United States, the P90 is in use with over 200 law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service. 

FAMAS 

FAMAS stands for Fusil d'Assaut de la Manufacture d'Armes de St-Etienne. Development of this rifle began in 1967, under the leadership of the Paul Tellie, a French arms designer. This new rifle was intended to replace in service the MAS Mle.49/56 semi-automatic rifles, MAT-49 submachine guns, and some MAC Mle.1929 light machine guns. The FAMAS rifle was adopted by the French in 1978 and since then became a standard French Army shoulder-fired small arm, known among the French soldiers as “Le Clairon" (the bulge). It is still used by the French army, and was exported in small numbers to some countries like the Senegal or United Arab Emirates. The FAMAS G2, which appeared circa 1994, has the G1-style enlarged trigger guard but can accept only STANAG type (M16-compatible) magazines. It was adopted and purchased by the French Navy in the 1995, with the French Army soon following suit, and also offered for export. At the present time, the slightly upgraded FAMAS G2 rifle is used as a platform for the future FELIN system (a French counterpart to the US “Land Warrior" program), which incorporates various electronic sights and sensors connected to soldier-carried equipment such as helmet mounted displays, ballistic and tactical computers, etc. GIAT also now offers some variations of the basic FAMAS G2 rifle, such as “Submachine Gun" (with a shortened receiver and 320mm-long barrel), “Commando" (with the standard receiver and the 405mm barrel), and the “Sniper" (with a longer and heavier 620mm barrel and an integral scope mount instead of the carrying handle). 

Steyr-Aug 

First available in 1977, the AUG is an Austrian bullpup 5.56mm assault rifle, designed in the early 1970s by Steyr Mannlicher GmbH & Co KG. In production since 1978, it is the standard small arm of the Austrian Bundesheer and various national police units. The rifle has also been adopted by the armed forces of Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Ireland, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia (introduced in 1978), Pakistan, and – since 1988 – U.S. Customs. 

Remington 700 

First manufactured in 1962, the model 700 series of firearms are bolt-action hunting rifles. All are based on the same centerfire bolt action. The Model 700 is available in a great number of different stock, barrel and caliber configurations. It is a development of the Remington 721 and 722 series of rifles, which had been introduced in 1948. This particular specimen has a wooden stock and is chambered for the middle-of-the-road .223 round. 

ArmaLite AR-15/Ruger Mini-14 

A favorite of survivalists and gun-fanatics, the AR-15 is a demilitarized, civilian version of the M-16 assault rifle. Standard AR-15 rifles accept detachable magazines of widely varying capacities, and have a pistol grip that protrudes beneath the stock. AR-15 rifles are highly configurable and customizable. They are commonly fitted with several accessories such as bipods, folding or collapsing stocks, threaded barrels for the attachment of a flash suppressor, and a rail system for the attachment of vertical grips, flashlights, laser sights, telescopic sights, etc. The AR-15 rifle is available from 1958 to the present. 

Ithaca 37 

First produced in 1937, the Ithaca 37 is a classic 12 gauge pump-action shotgun used by hunters and law enforcement professionals for decades, and made in large numbers for the civilian, military, and police markets. Also known as the Featherlight, it utilizes a novel combination ejection/loading port on the bottom of the gun which leaves the sides closed to the elements. In addition, the outline of the gun is clean. Finally, since shells load and eject from the bottom, operation of the gun is equally convenient from either side of the gun. This makes the gun popular with left-handed and right-handed shooters alike. 

Crossbow 

This recurve crossbow features a black synthetic stock and fiberglass limbs that offer pure performance. The 14" power stroke with a 150lb. draw weight delivers arrow speeds of up to 365 FPS with a 16" aluminum arrow. Features built-in adjustable sights and a rail-mounted scope for precision accuracy. Animal control officers and bounty hunters use these crossbows with syringe bolts for long-range live capture. 

Remington Model 30 

Produced from 1921 to 1941, the Remington Model 30 is a US sporting rifle of the inter-war period based on the military P14/M1917 Enfield rifle action, which was manufactured for the British and US governments during World War I. Most early rifles were in the military .30-06 caliber used in the M1917 but it became available in a variety of chamberings. It was the first high-powered bolt-action sporting rifle produced by Remington. These statistics are representative of other powerful .30-.06 hunting rifles. 

Tranquilizer Rifle 

This CO2 rifle from DAN-INJECT fires a compressed-air powered syringe dart from a .50 caliber smooth-bore barrel. Compact and reliable, with synthetic furniture and a weather-resistant anodized aluminum barrel and stainless steel fixtures. As the manometer and telescopic sight can be viewed simultaneously, pressure adjustment is rapidly and silently achieved without the operator losing sight of the target. 

Sawn-Off Double-Barreled Shotgun 

The #1 choice for zombie killin’, unless of course you can rig up one with four side-by-side barrels. This is essentially a Ruger Gold Label (or any number of identical side-by-side break action hunting shotguns) with a sawn-off stock for a pistol grip, and a sawn-off barrel for improved close-quarters handling, concealability, and close-range spread. 

Mossberg 590 

Produced from 1961 to the present, the Mossberg 500 is a shotgun manufactured by O.F. Mossberg & Sons. Rather than a single model, the 500 is really a series of widely varying hammerless, pump action repeaters, all of which share the same basic receiver and action, but differ in bore size, barrel length, choke options, magazine capacity, and “furniture" (stock and forearm) materials. The Model 590A1 is a Model 590 with an aluminum trigger guard and safety, and a heavier barrel, intended for military use under extreme conditions and rough handling; the metal trigger guard was added in response to the 3443G materials requirements, and the heavy barrel was added at the request of the Navy. The 590A1 is generally sold through military and law enforcement channels, though in most jurisdictions the 18.5-inch (47 cm) and 20-inch (51 cm) models may be legally purchased by private persons. 

CheyTac Intervention 

The CheyTac Intervention is an American bolt action sniper rifle manufactured by CheyTac LLC for long range interdiction. It is fed by a detachable single stack magazine, which holds 7 rounds. It fires .408 CheyTac or .375 CheyTac ammunition. CheyTac papers state that the entire system is capable of delivering sub-MOA accuracy at ranges of up to 2,500 yards (2,300 m), one of the longest ranges of all modern-day sniper rifles. The CheyTac muzzle brake suppressor, manufactured by OPS INC, is a stainless steel suppressor. The all stainless steel construction with no replaceable parts guarantees a suppressor life that equals or exceeds the life of the rifle. The primary sight is the Nightforce NXS 5.5-22×56 variable magnification telescopic sight with a 56mm objective. The night vision system chosen is the AN/PVS-14 GEN III Pinnacle monocular. The PVS-14 is attached to the day optic using the Monoloc device. An AN/PEQ-2 infrared laser is used for system support with the night vision sight under conditions where there is insufficient ambient light or the IR laser is needed for further target illumination. The device is attached to a titanium strut. A Vector IV mil spec laser rangefinder is used to establish ranging data. This laser rangefinder can measure distance up to 6 km (3.7 mi), angles and also features a 360° digital compass and class 1 eye safe filters. The Intervention holds the world record for best group at a distance, landing 3 bullets within 16⅝ inches (42 cm) at 2,321 yards (2,122 m). 

Dragunov 

The Dragunov sniper rifle is a semi-automatic sniper rifle chambered in 7.62×54mmR and developed in the Soviet Union. Since then, the Dragunov has become the standard squad support weapon of several countries, including those of the former Warsaw Pact. 

RPG-7 

The RPG-7 is a widely-produced, portable, shoulder-launched, anti-tank rocket-propelled grenade weapon. Originally the RPG-7 and its predecessor, the RPG-2, were designed by the Soviet Union, and are now manufactured by the Bazalt company. The ruggedness, simplicity, low cost, and effectiveness of the RPG-7 have made it the most widely used anti-tank weapon in the world. Currently around 40 countries use the weapon, and it is manufactured in a number of variants by nine countries. It is also popular with irregular and guerrilla forces. The RPG has been used in almost all conflicts across all continents since the mid-1960s from the Vietnam War to the present day War in Afghanistan and Iraq War. 

L86 LSW 

The development of the SA-80 (Small Arms family for 1980s) was started in Britain by the late 1960s, with the search for the “ideal" small-bore ammunition. The LSW was based on the SA-80 IW design. The final version of the SA-80 LSW was adopted by the British Army in 1986, and slightly over the 22,000 LSW weapons were manufactured before the production of both L85 IW and L86 LSW was ceased. The L86A1 was plagued by the same problems as its sister, the L85A1 rifle. In fact, the L86A1 was more suitable as a semi-automatic para-sniper rifle than the LSW / LMG, due to the poor reliability in full automatic fire, relatively small (by machine guns standards) magazine capacity, and the lack of quick detachable barrels. Current British troops prefer much heavier and belt-fed 7.62mm L7A1 GPMG (a license-built copy of Belgian FNMAG general purpose machine gun), and at the present time, the existing stocks of L86A1 are complemented with the 5.56mm FN Minimi belt-fed LMG in the short-barreled Para configuration. The L86A1 will be used mostly as a longer-range aimed fire weapon, while the suppressive fire functions will be conducted using the more effective FN Minimi. General design of the L86A1 is mostly similar to the design of L85A1 rifle, except for the following: the L86A1 has a longer barrel, with the steel stock extension under it, which carries the folding bipods; the bolt and trigger system are modified, so the gun can be fired from open bolt; the butt is fitted with folding shoulder support; the vertical grip is attached below the receiver, behind the magazine housing; the L86A1 could not be fitted with bayonet. 

M79 Grenade Launcher 

First available in 1960, The M79 grenade launcher is a single-shot, shoulder-fired, break-action grenade launcher which fires a 40×46mm grenade, and first appeared during the Vietnam War. Because of its distinctive report, it earned the nicknames of “Thumper", “Thump-Gun", “Bloop Tube", and “Blooper" among American soldiers. The M79 can fire a wide variety of 40mm rounds, including explosive, anti-personnel, smoke, buckshot, flechette, and illumination. While largely replaced by the M203, the M79 has remained in service in many units worldwide in niche roles. 

RPD 

The RPD (Russian: ручной пулемёт Дегтярёва – Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyaryova; English: hand-held machine gun of Degtyaryov) is a light machine gun developed in the Soviet Union by Vasily Degtyaryov for the intermediate 7.62×39mm M43 cartridge. It was created as a replacement for the DP machine gun chambered for the 7.62×54mmR Mosin rifle round. It is a precursor of most squad automatic weapons. The RPD is an automatic weapon using a gas-operated long stroke piston system and a locking system recycled from previous Degtyaryov small arms, consisting of a pair of hinged flaps set in recesses on each side of the receiver. The weapon fires from an open bolt. The RPD is striker fired and features a trigger mechanism that is limited to fully automatic fire only. The bolt is equipped with a spring-loaded casing extraction system and a fixed insert inside the receiver housing serves as the ejector. Spent cartridge casings are ejected downward through an opening in the bolt carrier and receiver. Like many other rugged Russian-made firearms, the chamber and bore are chrome-lined, greatly decreasing the risk of corrosion and jamming. The weapon has a non-removable barrel with a 3-position gas adjustment valve used to control the performance of the gas system. It is also equipped with a folding integral bipod, wooden shoulder stock, foregrip and pistol grip. The firearm strips down into the following major groups: the receiver and barrel, bolt, bolt carrier, feed tray and feed cover, the recoil mechanism and the trigger group and stock. The machine gun feeds from the left-hand side from a segmented, open-link metallic belt (each segment holds 50-rounds). Two combined belts (linked by cartridge), containing a sum total of 100 rounds are stored in a metal container resembling a drum, are attached to the base of the receiver. The LMG is equipped with a set of open-type iron sights. 

M203 

Designed in 1968, The M203 is a single shot 40mm grenade launcher that attaches to many rifles, but was originally designed for the U.S. M16 and its variant, the M4 Carbine. In the U.S. military, when a rifle or carbine is equipped with the launcher, both weapons are collectively referred to as an M203. Stand-alone variants exist as do versions capable of being used on many other rifles. 

M60E3 

The M60 (formally the United States Machine Gun, Caliber 7.62mm, M60) is a family of American general purpose machine guns firing 7.62×51mm NATO cartridges from a disintegrating belt of M13 links. There are several types of live ammunition approved for use in the M60, including ball, tracer, and armor-piercing rounds. Introduced in 1957, it has served with every branch of the U.S military and still serves with other armed forces. Its manufacture and continued upgrade for military and commercial purchase continues into the 21st century, though it has been replaced or supplemented in most roles by other designs, notably the M240 in U.S service. 

Barrett M90 

The Barrett M90 is a bolt-action, bullpup sniper rifle, chambered in the massively powerful .50 BMG (12.7×99mm) round, and designed by Barrett Firearms Company. The M90 was designed and produced from 1990 to 1995 as a bolt-action alternative to the semi-automatic Barrett M82. It is a bolt-action rifle in a bullpup design. The weapon features a fluted barrel with integrated muzzle brake, 2 part receiver (upper and lower), folding bipod, and a 5-round detachable box magazine. The M90 has no iron sights, but instead has a Picatinny rail for the mounting of a scope. In 1995, Barrett stopped production of the M90, and replaced it with the M95 (same game statistics). 

Barrett M82 

Designed in 1980, the M82 (also more recently known as the M107) is a recoil-operated, semi-automatic anti-materiel rifle developed by the American Barrett Firearms Manufacturing. A heavy SASR (Special Application Scoped Rifle), it is used by many units and armies around the world. It is also called the “Light Fifty" for its .50 caliber BMG (12.7mm) chambering. In layman's terms, a gigantic anti-vehicular sniper rifle.


THROWING WEAPONS 

These weapons are all used with the Throwing Weapons Combat Skill. Throwing weapons can be thrown with one hand, but readying a throwing weapon is a Move Action that requires both hands to be more-or-less free. If you purchase a throwing weapon with a Pick or Picks, you receive 2d6 of that weapon – otherwise the prices listed are for individual throwing weapons. 

Weapon

Damage

Notes

Picks (Price)

Throwing Knife

1d6 + Strength

 –

1 ($10)

Shuriken

1d6 + Speed

+1 to Attack Rolls with this weapon.

2 ($25)

Molotov Cocktail

4d6

Targets within one yard of ground zero take full damage; targets two yards away take only 2d6, and targets three yards away take only 1d6 damage. Targets further than three yards away are unaffected. All targets damaged this way are on fire and take 1d6 fire damage per Turn unless extinguished with a successful Speed Check and Full Turn Action.

2 ($60)

Gas Grenade

As toxin.

Can be filled with one dose of any drug or toxin that can be aerosolized as a gas. Once fired, spreads a cloud of gas covering a radius out to 2d6 yards from point of impact. This gas cloud may move or disperse with the wind at the GM's discretion.

3 ($175 plus toxin)

Fragmentation Grenade

8d6

Only the targets within a yard of ground zero take the full damage. For every yard away a target is, they take 2d6 less damage. For instance, a target two yards away would take only 4d6 damage.

3 ($350)

 


AMMUNITION 

Weapons “purchased” with Weapon Picks come fully loaded, whereas weapons purchased with cash come empty. In either case, for weapons that use clips, one magazine is included, but additional empty spare mags must be purchased in order to reload the weapon quickly. Weapons load only the type of ammo listed in parenthesis next to their names. 


NORMAL AMMUNITION 

Caliber

Count Per Box

Notes

Price Per Box

.38 Special FMJ

50

 –

$15.00

.38 Special Hollow Points

20

+1d6 Damage but double target’s Armor (if any).

$21.00

9×19mm Parabellum FMJ

50

 –

$13.00

9×19mm Hollow Points

20

+1d6 Damage but double target’s Armor (if any).

$20.00

.32 ACP

50

 –

$21.00

.45 ACP FMJ

50

 –

$23.00

.45 ACP Hollow Points

20

+1d6 Damage but double target’s Armor (if any).

$24.00

5.7×28mm

50

 –

$30.00

.357 Magnum

50

 –

$20.00

.50AE

20

 –

$38.00

.30-06

20 [1000]

[Case of 50 Boxes]

$26.00 [$1100]

7.62×39mm

20

 –

$14.00

7.62×54mm

20

 –

$21.00

7.62×51mm

20 [1000]

[Case of 50 Boxes]

$16.00 [$600.00]

5.56mm

20 [1000]

[Case of 50 Boxes]

$10.00 [$424.00]

.223

20

 –

$17.00

12 Gauge Buckshot (00)

5 [250]

[Case of 50 Boxes]

$5.00 [$204.00]

12 Gauge Slug

5

Change damage to 1d6 + 12. Ignore special rules for shotguns.

$11.00

.408 Chey Tac

20 [198]

[198 Round Can]

$147.00 [$1,450]

.50 BMG

10

 –

$55.00

Spare Clip (Empty)

NA

Required for loading weapons that use clips.

$25.00 per spare magazine.

Spare Drum (Empty)

NA

Required for loading weapons that use drums.

$125 per spare drum

Speedloader

NA

Allows for faster reloading of a Cylinder loaded weapon.

$10.00 per speedloader.

Machine Gun Box/Belt

NA

Required in addition to ammo in order to use full-sized machine guns.

$100.00 per box/belt.

 


SPECIAL AMMUNITION 

Caliber

Count

Notes

Price Per Count

Pistol Crossbow Bolts

6

For mini-crossobw. Can be retrieved and reused, unless destroyed (destroyed on a roll of 1-2 on 1d6).

$20

Crossbow Bolts

6

For crossbow. Can be retrieved and reused, unless destroyed (destroyed on a roll of1 on 1d6).

$60

Mini-Injection Bolt

1

For mini-crossbow. Can be filled with any drug/toxin. Damage is 6 plus effect of toxin.

$20

Injection Bolt

1

For crossbow. Can be filled with any drug/toxin. Damage is 12 plus effect of toxin.

$60

Taser Cartridges

2

For Tasers.

$50

Tranquilizer Dart

5

For tranquilizer pistol/rifle. Can be filled with any drug/toxin.

$25

M406 40×46mm HE Grenade

1

8d6 Damage (-2d6 for every yard from ground zero.)

$60

M576 40×46mm Buckshot

1

Essentially a giant shotgun shell. 11d6 Damage versus unarmored targets, 5d6 damage versus targets with even one point of armor. No blast radius, but use shotgun rules for Attack.

$80

M650 40×46mm Gas Grenade

1

Can be filled with one dose of any drug or toxin that can be aerosolized as a gas. Once fired, spreads a cloud of gas covering a radius out to 2d6 yards from point of impact. This gas cloud may move or disperse with the wind at the GM's discretion.

$50 (plus toxin)

M1006 40×46mm Nonlethal “Sponge Grenade”

1

8d6 Nonlethal damage to a single target. No blast.

$22

85mm HE Rocket Propelled Grenade

1

 –

$500

 


WEAPON ACCESSORIES 

Weapon accessories can be installed on weapons by making a Gunsmith Skill Test – the difficulty can vary from Very Easy (+4) to Hard (-2) at the GM’s discretion. Accessories cannot be installed on weapons that already come with the same accessory “built in,” or on heavy weapons

Accessory

Effects

Compatibility

Price

Foregrip/Folding Stock

Reduce Recoil Penalties by 1.

Pistols and machine pistols tend to have folding stocks whereas SMGs and shotguns tend to have foregrips. GM’s discretion.

$150

Silencer/Suppressor

A normal gunshot can be heard anywhere within 100 yards with a Very Easy Wits Check. Hearing a silenced gunshot from the same range is a Hard Wits Check. The same applies to pinpointing the location of a concealed attacker.

Pistols and rifles have silencers – automatic weapons have suppressors. Shotguns and revolvers can’t be silenced or suppressed. Incompatible with Bayonet.

$200

Laser Aiming Module

Provides a +2 Bonus to Attack Rolls but also provides a +2 Bonus to Speed Checks to Dodge the Attack.

Incompatible with all Scopes. GM’s discretion for which weapons can have laser sights.

$500

Scope

Reduce Range Penalties by 1. Enables use of “Sniper” Technique.

Incompatible with L.A.M. or Military Scope. Usually only for revolvers and magnums.

$500

Military Scope

Reduce Range Penalties by 1. Enables use of “Sniper” Technique. +2 Bonus to Attack Rolls.

Assault rifles and sniper rifles only. Incompatible with LAM and Scope.

$2,500

Bayonet

Can be used as Bayonet (melee weapon).

Rifles/shotguns only.

$100

 


ARMOR 

Body armor reduces damage from successful attacks by a flat amount. However, EVERY successful attack does at least 1 point of damage, so damage cannot be reduced below 1. Body armor reduces melee damage (like from clawing, biting, stabbing, slashing, and bludgeoning attacks) and ranged damage (like from bullets and grenades) differently. Body armor does not protect against attacks that target the head unless otherwise noted. 

The GM is free to disallow body armor for characters that wouldn’t realistically have any. 

Characters can only wear one piece of armor at a time. 

Armor

Benefit

Notes

Price

Heavy Leather Jacket

Melee Damage Cut: 4; Ranged Damage Cut: 1

-1 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.) Protects torso, arms, and legs.

$200

Flak Jacket

Melee Damage Cut: 1; Ranged Damage Cut: 4

Protects torso only.

$350

Type I Body Armor (Ballistic Vest)

Melee Damage Cut: 2; Ranged Damage Cut: 6

Protects torso only.

$1,000

Type II Body Armor (Ballistic Vest)

Melee Damage Cut: 4; Ranged Damage Cut: 12

Protects torso only.

$2,000

Type III Body Armor (Ballistic Vest)

Melee Damage Cut: 7; Ranged Damage Cut: 18

Protects torso only. -2 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.)

$3,000

Type III Body Armor w/ Helmet

Melee Damage Cut: 7; Ranged Damage Cut: 18

Protects entire body, including head. -2 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.)

$4,000

Type IV Body Armor (Ballistic Vest)

Melee Damage Cut: 9; Ranged Damage Cut: 24

Protects torso only. -3 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.)

$5,000

Type IV Body Armor w/ Helmet

Melee Damage Cut: 9; Ranged Damage Cut: 24

Protects entire body, including head. -3 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.)

$6,000

Riot Armor

Melee Damage Cut: 10; Ranged Damage Cut: 10

Protects entire body, including head. -4 to Speed when worn. (Minimum Speed of 1.)

$7,500

 


TRANQUILIZERS AND IMMOBILIZING AGENTS 

Drug

Onset Delay (Rounds/Seconds)

Effects Per Dose*

Dosage/Common Street Cost**

Sedative [Weak (Civilian)] (Ketamine, Phenobarbital, Thorazine)

1d6 + 5/60-110

For 2d6 Turns after onset, at the end of their Turn, the victim suffers 6 nonlethal damage and must succeed an Easy Will Check or immediately lose consciousness for one hour.

200mg (Ketamine)/$100

Paralytic Agent [Average (Law Enforcement)] (Sodium Thiopental, Vercuronium Bromide)

1d3 + 2/30-50

For 2d6 Turns after onset, at the end of their Turn, the victim suffers 10 nonlethal damage and must succeed a Will Check or immediately lose consciousness for10d6 minutes.

1 gram (Sodium Thiopental)/$500

Incapacitating Agent [Strong (Military)] (Immobilon/M99)

1/10

For 1d6 Turns after onset, at the end of the Turn, the victim suffers 20 nonlethal damage and must succeed a Hard Strength Check and a Hard Will Check or immediately lose consciousness for1d6 + 6 Hours.

0.01mg (M99)/$1000

 

* Doses beyond the first while the first is still active inflict twice the damage of the first dose. This extra damage is lethal unless the victim makes a successful Hard Strength Check when injected with the extra dose. 

** An appropriate Test is necessary to find this drug, at the GM’s discretion.


OTHER ITEMS 


First Aid Kit

($50)

 Allows you to make an Average First Aid Skill Test to restore a number of d6 of Health to a wounded character equal to your First Aid Skill Bonus. Without a first aid kit, this Test may be Hard, Very Hard, or outright impossible at the GM’s discretion.


Flashlight

($15) 

Reduces visibility Difficulty Modifiers from darkness by two when illuminated. Characters holding lit flashlights in a dark room receive a Defense Modifier of -2, however.


Night Vision Goggles

($700) 

Negates all visibility Defense Modifiers from darkness when worn. Targets you Attack in a dark room do not receive a positive Defense Modifier for visibility if you are wearing Night Vision Goggles. Also eliminates other negative Difficulty Modifiers that might occur as a result of darkness.


COMBAT RULES 

Outside of combat, playing a DicePunk System game is a fairly abstract exercise. Neither timing nor positioning of characters is closely or precisely tracked. PCs loosely describe what actions their characters take, speak as their characters, and interact with each other and GM controlled NPCs. A few sentences of narration might elapse several weeks of in-game time, or several hours of time might be given to a few short moments of intense, unfolding story, bringing it into "slow motion". Generally speaking, though, most in-character conversation takes place in the same amount of game time and real time. This is the case in most RPGs, and it's perfectly fine. 

When the shit hits the fan and what happens is really going to matter for the PCs – when people could very well get dead – we enter Combat. The pace of the game slows down, allowing for more methodical and precise actions and decision making. Every Turn matters. Combat in the DicePunk System is fun, fast paced, and deadly. A typical DicePunk System combat might take anywhere from a half hour to an hour of real time to resolve, but what's going down in game happens in a matter of mere seconds. 


THE COMBAT ROUND 

The Combat Round in the DicePunk System lasts 10 seconds. A combat might be just one Round long; average firefights last 3-6 Rounds, and a really epic battle might last ten Rounds or more. The Combat Round is divided into oneTurn for each combatant. These Turns follow a specific order of operations, as player characters and the GM take their Turns describing what their characters do. Every character gets one and only one Turn per Combat Round. 


INITIATIVE 

The first thing that happens in a combat is that each character rolls Initiative. This means that the first time a PC decides to pull out a gun or attempts to pummel someone, before resolving that, the first thing the GM does is say: "Roll Initiative!" 

The Initiative roll for virtually all characters is (Speed × 2) + 2d6. All PCs and named NPCs should have unique Initiative scores, but groups of "goons" – similar enemies – can all act on the same Initiative, to simplify bookkeeping. Characters act in Initiative Order, form the highest score to the lowest. As Initiative "collisions" will happen, characters with the same Initiative act simultaneously: i.e. two characters with Initiative 14 shooting at each other will both get shot at. Even if one of them is shot and killed by the other, his shot still goes off. 

Note: Characters with the Reposition Technique have the option of rerolling their Initiative between Combat Rounds, or keeping their last Initiative. Characters without Reposition are stuck with their Initiative result for the duration of the combat. In other words, by default, Initiative is not rerolled between Combat Rounds, unless a character has the Technique that lets them do that.


SURPRISE 

If one or more combatants has the drop on the opposition – such as by using Stealth to strike from concealment or set up an ambush, or if combat began with one side holding the other at gunpoint – that character or group of characters gets an entire free Round worth of Actions (one Turn per character with the element of surprise) before Initiative is rolled. 

This is the exception to the rule of "rolling Initiative is the very first thing you do in combat". The GM is the final arbiter of which side, if any, has gotten the drop on the other.


ANATOMY OF A COMBAT TURN 

Within each Combat Round, each combatant has exactly one and only one Combat Turn. In many other roleplaying games – including some I have designed – faster combatants are allowed to "go" more times per Combat Round. While there is nothing innately wrong with that, the DicePunk System restricts itself to one turn per combatant per Combat Round, because that makes Combat Rounds, and therefore combats, faster. 

As previously mentioned, Combat Turns occur in descending order of Initiative. Each Combat Turn, by default, allows the acting character one Move Action and one Attack Action (in that order) and any number of Free Actions

Any character may choose not to Move or not to Attack in a given turn, or to "pass" their Combat Turn entirely. 


TECHNIQUES AND THE COMBAT TURN 

Characters with the Blitzkrieg Technique may choose to take two Move Actions instead of one Move Action and oneAttack Action. They can also elect to Attack and then Move. By default, characters may only Move and then Attack, in that order

Characters with the Frenzy Technique may choose to Attack twice (take two Attack Actions) instead of taking a Move Action and an Attack Action as normal. In this case, each Attack is made at a -2 Penalty. Other Techniques may allow multiple Attacks, with different limitations depending on the Technique.


COMBAT MOVEMENT 

The standard Move Action is to, um... move... your Speed in yards. You could use miniatures and a battle mat (with a scale of one yard per hex/square) to keep track of character movement and position, but this isn't necessary by any means. 

Position does matter, though, even if you choose to track it abstractly. One important aspect of combat movement is that characters must be adjacent (defined as within three feet of each other) to engage in melee combat. Another is that different ranged weapons have different effective ranges, also measured in yards. 

Characters with the Blitzkrieg Technique can use a Full Turn Action to move twice their Speed in yards, useful for making a quick getaway. 

Besides moving, there are numerous other actions that count as Move Actions. Generally speaking, these actions are more involved than Free Actions, but not as time-consuming as Attack Actions.


COMBAT ACTIONS 

The following tables list the most common Actions characters might take in combat, what type of Action they require (Move or Attack), and anything else you'll want to know about them. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, but should include enough examples for the GM to determine what kind of Action something requires if the players get creative. 


MOVE ACTIONS 

Move Action

Test Required

Notes

Move (Speed) yards

None.

 –

Open/close door or container

None.

 –

Drop prone or stand up

None.

Prone characters receive a -2 Defense Modifier versus Melee Attacks but a +2 Defense Modifier versus Ranged Attacks. Prone characters can only move half their Speed (round down) by crawling without standing up.

Put away a weapon or ready a weapon (Note: not both)

None.

 –

Reload firearm (Change clips)

None.

 –

Take cover

None.

Generally ends with you (half Speed) yards away and prone, behind any available cover within range, at the GM's discretion.

Control a vehicle

Bike, or Drive, or Pilot, etcetera.

Skill differs depending on the vehicle. Drivers can still make one Attack Action while driving, but must spend their Move Action to control the vehicle. The difficulty is likewise variable, depending on the driving conditions and what you're trying to accomplish.

Pick up/drop item (Note: not both)

None.

 –

Aim

None.

Each Action spent aiming at a target applies a Defense Modifier of -2, up to a maximum -DM of twice the aiming character’s weapon Skill Bonus.

Use Technique

Variable

Only for Techniques that can be used as Move Actions.

 


ATTACK ACTIONS 

Attack Action

Test Required

Notes

Fire a gun

Pistols, Rifles, Automatics, or Heavy Weapons

 –

Attack in melee

Blades, Clubs, or Brawling

 –

Throw weapon

Throwing Weapons

 –

Smash window/kick in door

Strength Check

 –

Reload Firearm (revolver or internal magazine)

None

 –

Use terminal/computer

Maybe

 –

Use Technique

Variable

Techniques that can be used as Attack Actions only.

 


FREE ACTIONS 

Free Actions have little or no effect on the tactical situation. Typical Free Actions include speaking up to ten seconds worth of in-character dialogue (individual GMs can and will adjust this number according to their personal preference for mid-battle soliloquy) or making hand gestures (of either the tactical or just plain rude variety). 

Anything else is most likely significant enough (i.e. has enough of an impact on the unfolding tactical situation) to be counted as a Move or Attack Action, but if you think something might be insignificant enough to be a Free Action, ask your GM.


REACTIONS 

Reactions don't count as Attack ActionsMove Actions, or even Free Actions. They happen outside the normal flow of Initiative. Reactions are granted only by Techniques and other special conditions. 

Reaction

Technique Needed

Test Required?

Notes

Counter

Counter Attack

Melee Attack Roll

Whenever you are hit in melee combat, you may make a free, immediate Melee Attack Roll (in the same Combat Turn) at a -1 Penalty against the character who just hit you.

Reflexive Dodge

Dodge

Speed Check

If you have not acted yet in a Combat Round, you may give up your upcoming turn to reflexively dodge an Attack Roll being made against you. You must declare that you are dodging before the Attack Roll is made. If you succeed a Speed Check, add ½ your Speed (round up) to your Defense for the duration of the Combat Round.

 


HURTING PEOPLE 

Now we come to the meat of it, and all the lovely little nitty-gritty details. The default Attack Action is, unsurprisingly, to Attack – whether it be with your bare hands, a melee weapon, a gun, or a thrown weapon. You do so by making an Attack Roll. 

Roll 2d6 and add the appropriate Skill Bonus. If your result is equal to or greater than the target's Defense, your Attack hits and deals damage

Characters can also use Attack Actions for other things, besides attacking. 


MELEE COMBAT 

To Attack a character in melee, you must close to within one yard and make an Attack Roll, rolling 2d6 and adding your Skill Bonus from Blades (if using an edged weapon), Clubs (if using a blunt weapon), or Brawling (if unarmed or using an improvised weapon). If your result is equal to or greater than the target's Defense, you hit, although the target may still have the option to Counter Attack or reflexively Dodge depending on what Techniques the target knows. 

In the default mode of play, a basic human being's punch or kick deals 1d6 + Strength Subdual Damage, but this can change based on Campaign Power Level

Attacks with melee weapons also benefit from Strength. Add ½ your Strength (round up) to the damage of one-handed melee weapons (like kitchen knives, claw hammers, and rapiers), and your full Strength to the damage of two-handed melee weapons (like baseball bats, pick-axes, and claymores). 


GRAPPLING 

A character who makes a successful Melee Attack may choose to Grapple instead. Instead of making a normalAttack Roll, the two characters have a Strength Contest. If the defender knows and decides to use the Dodge Technique in response, the Grapple attempt automatically fails. Do not roll. If the defender knows and decides to use the Counter Attack Technique in response, resolve their Melee Counter Attack first. Only proceed with the Strength Contest if the grabbing character survives the Counter Attack. 

If the attacker wins the Strength Contest, the defending character is successfully Grappled. Grappled characters may not take any actions but attempting a Strength Contest to break free. If a Grappled character successfully breaks free, he may then Grapple the other character, thereby turning the tables. 

The character maintaining the Grapple may deal Unarmed Damage to the Grappled character by winning a Strength Contest as a Full Turn Action. Simply maintaining the Grapple is a Full Turn Action with no Test needed. 

Making a Strength Contest to Grapple – whether trying to deal Unarmed Damage or to escape from a Grapple – is a Full Turn Action. 

Grappled characters have their Defense reduced to 5. Grappling characters have their Defense reduced by 3 points.


MELEE DEFENSE MODIFIERS 

Situation

Defense Modifier

Attackers in melee outnumber defenders

-1 for each net friend in the melee to a maximum of -4. (Leona, literally kicking and screaming, as well as biting, clawing, and spitting, is being mobbed by four orderlies. Because she's outnumbered, she suffers -3 to her DM.)

Defenders in melee outnumber attackers

+1 for each net friend in the melee. (In the above example, Leona will have a hard time landing a punch on one of the orderlies. All of them receive a +3 Bonus to Defense.)

Defender grappled

Defense is set to 5. Ignore other Defense Modifiers.

Defender grappling

-3

Attacker Charging

-2 to both the Defender for this one Attack and the Attacker for the duration of the Combat Round.

 


RANGED COMBAT

From the turn of the 20th century onwards, civilized persons have primarily used ranged weapons like firearms to kill and maim one another. Characters Attack in ranged combat by making an Attack Roll using the appropriate Combat Skill (Pistols, Automatics, Rifles, Throwing Weapons, or Heavy Weapons). Roll 2d6 and add the appropriate Skill Bonus; if the result is greater than or equal to the target's modified Defense, your Attack hits and deals damage. 

Based ranged combat damage is determined entirely by the weapon used, with the exception of non-explosivethrowing weapons, which add Strength-based bonus damage just like one-handed melee weapons

Several factors make ranged combat slightly more complicated to resolve than melee combat. 


WEAPON RANGE INCREMENTS IN YARDS 

Weapon Type

Short Range (No Attack Penalty)

Medium Range (-1 Attack Penalty)

Long Range (-4 Attack Penalty)

Any Melee/Unarmed

<1 Yard

NA

NA

Muscle-Powered Weapon (Bow, Grenade, or Throwing Knife)

Strength × 2 Yards

Strength × 4 Yards

Strength × 6 Yards

Pistol (Including Taser and Mini Crossbow)

5 Yards (Max Range for Tasers)

30 Yards

90 Yards

Shotgun

5 Yards (+1d6 Damage within this range.)

40 Yards (-2 DM to Defender within this range.)

80 Yards

SMG

15 Yards

50 Yards

120 Yards

Rifle (Sniper, Hunting, or Tranquilizer, Including Barrett .50 BMG Sniper Rifles)

50 Yards

100 Yards

250 Yards

Rifle (Assault)

25 Yards

75 Yards

150 Yards

Machine Gun

40 Yards

90 Yards

150 Yards

Heavy Weapon (Rocket Launcher; Grenade Launcher)

50 Yards

100 Yards

150 Yards

 

Note1: Weapons effectively cannot be used on targets farther away than “Long Range”. 

Note2: Characters with the Longshot Technique double the range restrictions for each range category when using firearms. For instance, a character with Longshot using a pistol would treat targets within 10 Yards as at short range, would treat targets within 60 Yards as within medium range, and could hit targets within 180 Yards! 

Note3: The maximum ranges listed here are the ranges at which characters might realistically have a chance of hitting a target; they are not meant to reflect how far a weapon can throw a projectile.


BURST FIRE 

Automatics and other weapons capable of Burst Fire can fire three round bursts. Three round bursts use up three rounds of ammunition (duh) and are made at a -1 Penalty to the Attack, due to recoil. The character firing the burst must choose whether to "hose" or "spray" before making the Attack Roll

Hose: Attack deals +2d6 damage

Spray: Defender receives a -3 DM for this Attack.


SHOTGUNS 

First off, we're assuming that shotguns are firing 00 Buckshot. If it were something like birdshot, shotguns would deal significantly less damage, whereas slugs would make shotguns more like rifles. And we're not going to get into anything like adjustable chokes because we don't want to get crazy. With that said: 


FULL AUTO

Automatics and other weapons capable of autofire can blaze away on FA. This burst fires between five and thirty bullets – and for our purpose it must be a multiple of five, for the sake of simplicity. The number of shots fired is limited by the amount of ammo left in the clip. The Attack receives a -1 Recoil Penalty for every five rounds fired. The attacker must choose whether to hose or spray before making the Attack Roll. 

HoseThe Attack deals +1d6 damage for every five rounds fired. 

SprayThe defender receives a -2 DM for this Attack for every five rounds fired.


COVERING FIRE 

Automatics and other weapons capable of autofire can be used to cover an area, discouraging enemies from moving through it. If the attacker has at least thirty rounds in the clip, he can empty the entire clip to "cover" an area of (Wits) cubic yards from the moment he begins firing until the start of his next Combat Turn

Anyone moving through this area without taking cover – or popping up from cover to attack within this area – must succeed a Hard Speed Check or suffer the weapon's base damage.


GRENADES 

On a successful throw, grenades land at the feet of the target they were thrown at. On an unsuccessful throw, grenades can land anywhere, at the GM's discretion, but are likely to be close enough to damage the intended enemy anyway. 

Either way, grenades "go off" and deal damage to everything within their blast radius on the next Combat Turn of the character who threw them. In the intervening turns, a particularly brave character near the grenade can use a Move Action to make a successful Hard Speed Check to pick up the grenade. If the character succeeds, he can make aThrowing Weapons Test to throw the grenade elsewhere. If the character fails at picking up the grenade, he is right at ground zero when the grenade goes off.


RANGED DEFENSE MODIFIERS 

Situation

Defense Modifier

Defender has soft cover (bushes, glass door)

+1

Defender has partial cover (crate, car door)

+2

Defender has full cover (pillbox, trench)

+4

Attacker aiming

-2 for each Action the attacker has spent aiming up to a maximum –DM of twice your weapon Skill Bonus (i.e. -2 for Apprentice, -4 for Expert, -8 for Master). Aiming can only be used with firearms.

Defender running (moving 2 × Speed yards in one turn)

+2

Defender Prone

+2

Attacker using burst fire spray

-1 to -6

Poor visibility (partial light, glare, smoke or fog)

+2

Terrible visibility

+4

Attacker moving (attacker has moved at least Speed yards before attacking)

+1

Defender unaware of attacker's position

-6

 


HEALTH POINTS

(a sliding scale from not dead to dead) 

Your character can inhabit various states of being. 

Fresh characters are perfectly healthy to lightly wounded and have no significant penalties. 

Wounded characters are at or below one half their Health (rounded up). They receive a -2 to Strength and Speed (Min. 1)

Dying characters are those at or below 0 Health. While they can still move and act as long as they are not alsoUnconscious (see below) they may take only one Move Action or one Attack Action each Combat Turn. More importantly, they lose 1 Health each Combat Round until they die or are stabilized by a First Aid Test. No amount of Subdual damage can ever reduce a character past 0 Health. 

Unconscious characters are those whose Health is at or below their Knockout Threshold. They are almost certainly Wounded, and may also be Dying. Unconscious characters regain 1d6 Health in 10 - Strength hours, and regain consciousness if that brings them above their Knockout Threshold and they are not Dying. Unconscious characters can't do anything. 

Dead characters are those whose Health is at or below their Death Threshold. Depending on their stats, it is possible for a character to die without first being knocked unconscious, but not without being first Wounded, and then Dying. If your character is dead, you will have to make a new one. 


WOUND SHOCK 

Being shot with a big old gun or blown up or hacked with a fireaxe doesn't just hurt. It fucks you up. 

If a character sustains (Strength × 4) points of damage in a single blow from any Attack – after applying any appropriate Damage Cut from worn Armor – they are Stunned. That means they lose their next Combat Turn, having to spend it recovering: picking themselves off the ground, dusting themselves off, picking up whatever they were holding, blinking the blood out of their eyes until they can see and hear again, and so on. 

Giving the nod to realism is not mandatory. The GM is free to classify this as an optional rule and ignore it if the group feels that it makes the game less cinematic, slows things down, makes the game more deadly, or anything else they don't like.


DAMAGE AND HEALING 

To regain health naturally over time, you must spend at least eight hours doing nothing but resting. That means no fighting, no running, and no strenuous activity. 

Every eight solid hours of rest restores 2d6 + Strength points of Health

FIRST AID 

A successful First Aid Test can restore a few dice of health to a wounded character. First Aid can only be used this way once per day, and only once per wound, and only by a character with at least Apprentice level training in First Aid. 

First Aid must be used within one hour of the initial wound being sustained. Using First Aid requires a First Aid Kit or the Test will be made at substantial Penalty. Using First Aid takes at least five minutes. 

First Aid Skill Level

Health Restored

Apprentice (+1)

1d6 Health

Expert (+2)

2d6 Health

Master (+4)

4d6 Health

 

If a critical injury causes something gruesome to happen to a PC – like losing an eye or a limb – this, and any associated ad hoc penalties, cannot be healed simply by resting or First Aid. Professional medical attention at a hospital is required to fix such disfiguring and crippling wounds.


CHARACTER ADVANCEMENT 

Characters grow more powerful over time as they use their abilities. If you survive your first few brushes with death, you can expect to become very powerful indeed. What does not kill you will make you stronger. The first way that characters grow in power is by earning Experience Points. Experience Points will be awarded to you for defeating enemies, for reaching story milestones, for successfully accomplishing missions, and for individual instances of good roleplaying. 

Experience points are spent between game sessions – usually this means during the wrap-up portion or end of a game session, or during the beginning of the following session – to increase character power. XP need not be spent immediately, and can be saved up between sessions but does not transfer between characters. Spending XP can mean improving Attributes, improving existing Skills (or learning new ones), or learning new Techniques

Equipment, gear, and other possessions must be acquired solely through roleplaying, while improving/learning new Skills and Techniques requires both an expenditure of XP and access to a trainer or time to practice (even if this means the character “learns by doing”) at the GM’s discretion. 

The XP costs of different character improvements are described in the following table. 

Character Improvement

XP Cost

Notes and Other Requirements

Increase an Attribute (Strength, Speed, Wits or Will) by 1 (to a maximum of 10)

50 × Current Value (New Value <7) OR 100 × Current Value (New Value ≥ 7)

(Increasing Main Attributes increases derived statistics [Health, Initiative, Defense, etc.] normally.)

Train A New Skill (Learn new Skill at Trained [+0])

25

Another character (PC or NPC) with the Skill at Apprentice level (minimum) must ALWAYS be present to train the character, along with sufficient time and any necessary equipment. GM’s discretion.

Learn a Trained Skill (Increase a Trained [+0] Skill to Apprentice [+1])

50

At the GM’s discretion, another character (PC or NPC) with the Skill at Expert level (minimum) must be present to train the character, along with sufficient time and any necessary equipment.

Improve a Skill (Increase an Apprentice [+1] Skill to Expert [+2])

100

At GM’s discretion.

Master a Skill (Increase an Expert [+2] Skill to Master [+4] level)

250

At the GM’s discretion, another character (PC or NPC) with the Skill at Master level must be present and willing to train the character, along with sufficient time and any necessary equipment.

Buy 1 Technique Pick (Multiple Picks can be saved up)

100

At GM’s discretion.